Tutorial 140: Making Custom Effects - Linear Wipe

Joe Clay | Sep 7, 2018

If you're like me, you get annoyed sometimes when built-in After Effects effects are missing a feature that you want. For example, back in the day, the Ramp effect didn't let you swap the colors. It was a pain that was eventually alleviated.

That's how I feel about Linear Wipe sometimes. So this week, I decided to improve it. Linear Wipe only works in comp space, which is great if your layers are comp-sized. But if you need to put a Linear Wipe on text and then you have a change that forces you to move the text, you'll need to re-animate your wipe. That sucks.

Here's the code to fix it. It gets applied to a Mask Path property. I built a pseudo effect with Pseudo Effect Maker so all of the things that are linked with thisLayer will need to be modified for your controls. You'll need Point Controls called Size and Position Offset, a Slider Controls called Completion and Feather, and an Angle Control called Angle.

If you're a $20 Patron, this will be one of the included complex elements for this month. The Feather value in the mask properties can just be pickwhipped to the controller for feather.

size = mul(thisLayer("Effects")("Linear Wipe Improved")("Size"), .5); //cut the size in half
feather = thisLayer("Effects")("Linear Wipe Improved")("Feather");
size = size + [feather, feather];
pos = thisLayer("Effects")("Linear Wipe Improved")("Position Offset");
completion = Math.abs(thisLayer("Effects")("Linear Wipe Improved")("Completion")-100)/100; //1-0 range
completion = completion*2-1; //Convert 1-0 range into 1,-1

pts = [];
pts[0] = [size[0], -size[1]];
pts[1] = [size[0], size[1]];
pts[2] = [-size[0] * completion, size[1]];
pts[3] = [-size[0] * completion, -size[1]];

for(i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
    pts[i] = rotatePoint(pts[i]);
    pts[i] = translatePoint(pts[i]);
}
createPath(pts);

function rotatePoint(p) {
    angle = degreesToRadians(thisLayer("Effects")("Linear Wipe Improved")("Angle")-90); //zero out the default angle and convert it to radians for the math below
    x = (p[0] * Math.cos(angle)) - (p[1] * Math.sin(angle));
    y = (p[0] * Math.sin(angle)) + (p[1] * Math.cos(angle));
    return [x,y];
}

function translatePoint(p) {
    return p + pos;
}

The code for the rotation function was derived from this lesson on Khan Academy. I can't recommend them enough.

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. This project file includes the setups shown in the tutorial. A version is included that will open back to CC v13.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

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Tutorial 139: All Roads Lead to the Bench

Severo Ojea | Aug 31, 2018

This week, we're making roads in Cinema 4D. Have you always wanted to live out your Sim City childhood as an adult? No. Well that's unfortunate because that's what we're doing.

These roads are built to follow a spline, so you can build them in any shape you'd like. You can also use that path to animate cars along your road. Our project files also have an Xpresso setup so that you can swap out different types of roads if you need to.

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. This download contains one project file with everything shown in the tutorial. It also includes an Xpresso setup to allow you to change sections of the roads to portions of a bridge. This should work back to around R11.5.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

Get the project on Gumroad

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Tutorial 138: Better Glows in AE

Joe Clay | Aug 24, 2018

This week, we're taking a look at ways you can get around or improve After Effect's default Glow effect. Glow has some issues with it—one of the major ones is how linear it is. It doesn't have a ton of body by default. So in this tutorial we're going to explore other ways that you can build your own glows.

A few methods work well by stacking the Glow effect with various different radii and intensities. But the final versions I show in this tutorial eschew the Glow effect entirely and instead rely on various blurs stacked together with CC Composite. You can also stack other effects like Fill and Fractal Noise in between to get different looking glows—so experiment!

For more information on linking paths for a continuous trim between multiple paths, check out Tutorial 124: Linked Paths.

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. These project files contain the setups for each of the various glows showed in the tutorial as well as the background texture and the original Illustrator files for the shape layers. The original project was made in After Effects CC 2018, but there's also a version backsaved to CC v13.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

Get the project on Gumroad

Become a Patron

If you'd like to help support Workbench, check out our Patreon page. Thank you for even considering clicking this link to support what we're doing. We appreciate it. Patrons get all sorts of benefits, from R&D files, setups, and elements to early product releases.

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Tutorial 137: Animated Maps

Severo Ojea | Aug 17, 2018

A couple of weeks ago, someone—I can't find the original message unfortunately—asked us to recreate this beautiful animation by Toros Köse for Pause Fest 2018. They're really well done. They use 8K textures run through After Effects. AE crawls at even 4K so working with 8K couldn't have been fun. But the end result is beautiful titles for Pause Fest.

We set to work making displacement maps in a bunch of different ways. It's easier to generate terrain maps out of Cinema 4D since it has many more options and defaults for noise than After Effects. Conversely, if you want to do elaborate and specific write-on strokes, you can export your camera and displace 3D layers in AE with the Displacement Map effect—which is how the lines in the GIF below were created.

Also, this tutorial uses Redshift so if you want to use a different render engine, you'll have to adapt these ideas to your own project.

And thanks again to our sponsor, School of Motion. Make sure to check them out!

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. These project files contain the setups for a simple terrain, and the Workbench mountain. The C4D files will work back to R19. The AE files are built in CC 2018 but have also been backsaved to CC v13. There is also an animated EXR sequence.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

Get the project on Gumroad

Become a Patron

If you'd like to help support Workbench, check out our Patreon page. Thank you for even considering clicking this link to support what we're doing. We appreciate it. Patrons get all sorts of benefits, from R&D files, setups, and elements to early product releases.

Check out our Patreon Today

Tutorial 136: Procedural Tracking FUI

Joe Clay | Aug 10, 2018

This week we take use various techniques to pull mattes that we feed into the Minimax effect to make tracking marks that follow our footage. It's procedurally built so once you've made the setup, you just have to alter things to fit your source footage, but the rest of the effect will build itself.

We also learn how to use the transform effect to make effects that only have a horizontal or vertical effect conform to any angle we wish. That's a particular favorite of mine.

I love how well this works. It's perfect for FUI designs. And as a bonus, you can just use the mattes alone to add visual interest for backgrounds or whatever other uses you can find. So, as always I encourage you to go out and experiment!

If you want to experiment with the IR look, check out this and this.

And thanks again to our sponsor, School of Motion. Make sure to check them out!

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. The project files will work in legacy versions of AE. This download includes the footage, and all of the setups included in the tutorial, as well as a comp that has colored trackers.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

Get the project on Gumroad

Become a Patron

If you'd like to help support Workbench, check out our Patreon page. Thank you for even considering clicking this link to support what we're doing. We appreciate it. Patrons get all sorts of benefits, from R&D files, setups, and elements to early product releases.

Check out our Patreon Today

Tutorial 135: Effector Deformation

Severo Ojea | Aug 3, 2018

This week's C4D tutorial uses effectors in an interesting way. Instead of modifying Mograph clones, we're using them to deform geometry. By mixing a few things together we can get an interesting undulating liquid effect that kind of resembles a non-Netwonian fluid.

And thanks again to our sponsor, School of Motion. Make sure to check them out!

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. The C4D files contains two setups. One is the liquid pool, and the other will be a letter. One of them also contains the X-Particles setup. This should work back to about R18.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

Get the project on Gumroad

Become a Patron

If you'd like to help support Workbench, check out our Patreon page. Thank you for even considering clicking this link to support what we're doing. We appreciate it. Patrons get all sorts of benefits, from R&D files, setups, and elements to early product releases.

Check out our Patreon Today

Tutorial 134: Tiny Card Dancer

Joe Clay | Jul 27, 2018

This week, by request, we take a look at a cool effect from Pylik. We use a bunch of different glitch techniques like the ones we've show in our Glitchy playlist. Combined with the Card Dance effect, we build an effect that tracks itself to a face—or anything for that matter—using the luminance of some map layers.

And thanks again to our sponsor, School of Motion. Make sure to check them out!

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. The project files will work in legacy versions of AE. Some of the textured matte comps require AE CC 2018 versions that support Master Properties. I saved it out to an older version, but I'm not sure what kind of error you might get. Other than that, the test footage, textures, setups, and some extra unused items are all included in the download.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

Get the project on Gumroad

Become a Patron

If you'd like to help support Workbench, check out our Patreon page. Thank you for even considering clicking this link to support what we're doing. We appreciate it. Patrons get all sorts of benefits, from R&D files, setups, and elements to early product releases.

Check out our Patreon Today

Tutorial 133: Effector Reveal

Severo Ojea | Jul 20, 2018

This week we take a look at creating a reveal using effectors in Cinema 4D. We're applying it to text, but it can be applied to 3D objects as well. It's a useful effect that you can build upon and put into your bag of tricks.

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. The project files will work in modern versions of C4D. For one of the setups, you'll need to download CV Outline from Cineversity. There are 4 setups. The first is the base effect on an object. The other three are the steps outlined in the tutorial broken out into separate C4D files. The After Effects project to create the GIF above is also included, and there's a legacy version of it in case you're on an older version of AE.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

Get the project on Gumroad

Become a Patron

If you'd like to help support Workbench, check out our Patreon page. Thank you for even considering clicking this link to support what we're doing. We appreciate it. Patrons get all sorts of benefits, from R&D files, setups, and elements to early product releases.

Check out our Patreon Today

Tutorial 132: Shader Effector

Severo Ojea | Jul 13, 2018

This week's tutorial explores the Shader Effector inside of Cinema 4D. We'll be using it to animate randomized colors of clones. This will help you build things like blinking lights on a computer tower.

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. This project file will work in most recent versions of C4D. The computers are included but they have Redshift shaders so you will get an error if you don't have Redshift. The materials can be swapped to regular C4D materials without issue, however. So it won't affect the setups.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

Get the project on Gumroad

Become a Patron

If you'd like to help support Workbench, check out our Patreon page. Thank you for even considering clicking this link to support what we're doing. We appreciate it. Patrons get all sorts of benefits, from R&D files, setups, and elements to early product releases.

Check out our Patreon Today

Tutorial 131: Generative Elements

Joe Clay | Jul 6, 2018

This week, we take a look at a way to build elements out of simple comps in order to build generative elements that can be used in other designs.

We also mentioned our script, StackIt, which is useful for building up grids of elements.

Expressions

For the circuit built with Particle Playground, you'd use this expression with the Random Seed Master Property from Fractal Noise:

seedRandom(index,true);
random(1000);

And for the circuit built with Form, you'd use this expression with the Random Seed Master Property:

f = time/thisComp.frameDuration;
seedRandom(index, true);
(Math.floor(f/3)*10) + random(100);

If you want them to be more different from each other, you can increase the value inside of random() on the last line. You can probably also use timeToFrames() and posterizeTime() but I think this is easier.

Grab the Project Files

Get the project file through our Gumroad Store. This After Effects project file requires AE CC 2018 because it relies on Master Properties. All of the setups shown in the tutorial are included. There are also two additional versions without the gaps between the elements. You will need Red Giant's Trapcode Form if you intend to use that setup, but the Particle Playground version will work without any third-party plugins.

If you're buying project files, consider becoming a Patron. At the $5/mo. tier, you get access to project files as they come out and some tutorials also come with additional BTS content showing more of the builds.

Get the project on Gumroad

Become a Patron

If you'd like to help support Workbench, check out our Patreon page. Thank you for even considering clicking this link to support what we're doing. We appreciate it. Patrons get all sorts of benefits, from R&D files, setups, and elements to early product releases.

Check out our Patreon Today

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